Regurgitator Honour 25 Years Of ‘Tu Plang’ With Special Anniversary Deluxe Edition

Beloved Australian band Regurgitator are set to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of their debut album Tu Plang with a special digital deluxe release. Out today, the deluxe version is available HERE with a deluxe vinyl re-issue slated for Aus Music Month this coming November, pre-order the vinyl HERE.

Originally released back in 1996, Tu-Plang includes lead singles FSO and Kong Foo Sing as well as industry favourite I Sucked A Lot Of Cock To Get Where I Am, the album went on to pick up ARIA awards for Best Debut Album and Best Alternative Release.

Emerging from Brisbane in the mid-‘90s as alternative music bludgeoned the mainstream, the ‘Gurge’ quickly established themselves as a surreal staple on both radio and the touring circuit. As well as lovingly indulging in six Big Day Out tours, Regurgitator also gave touring partners such as Red Hot Chili Peppers, Boredoms, Helmet, Pansy Division, and The Prodigy some fun for their money when it came to satiating crowds with sweaty, energetic, genre-bending rock.

As frontman Quan Yeomans recollects… ” Our hotel was newly constructed but not quite operational. The rooms had no linen and no running water, lending them a fresh but oddly impractical feel. Each morning I’d wake up early, squirming on my bare mattress, swaddled in the amniotic sac of the previous nights dreams. I’d blunder out of the hotel’s lobby into the humidity that had barely relented overnight, often passing no one as I made my way down to the edge of the nearby morass. The tall, whispering grass that grew from its mud was an impenetrable wall, cut only by the thin, pale cement path that trailed off into the heart of it.

Every morning I paused there on threshold before entering, and as the walk progressed, so too grew the feeling that something was watching from the mire, urging me on to the safety of the studio complex.

By the time the studio doors were in sight, my gait had invariably quickened, and every time the glass shut behind me, the feeling was the same – that I had just outrun something unseen.

Music studios often remind me of casinos, in that once the doors close behind you, the outside world soon dissolves into vague memory.

For those blessed hours I threw myself at the work, glad to be occupied without distraction but every night as the band began to wind down, my mind was once more drawn to the journey back.

At night the swamp seemed to draw the darkness to it like a warm coat, only broken by the small blooms of street lamps set at 100 metre increments, each one partially obscured by an eclipse of moths, many the size of small bats.

At night, upon that cement path my fear always began the same way. It started like a ball of black leeches roiling in my stomach, then slithered up into my lungs, finally settling as a thick, writhing nest in my throat.

After the first night we all promised each other that we would never let anyone walk back alone. Each of us would carry sticks to ward off the packs of diseased dogs that roamed the path after dark but it wasn’t the dogs that terrified me. It was the swamp itself.

It was alive and the more it watched me as I travelled through it, the more it knew me, and the more I could sense that it was readying itself for something I could not guess.

After a couple of weeks of this I was a wreck. I recall the very last night of recording vividly. The work complete, the gear packed away. I was spent.

I stood at the glass doors, once more peering nervously out at the lamp that marked the start of the path through the marsh. However, this time the light was framed by a calmness. There were no swarming insects. It was bright and unobscured. With care I ventured to the outside. As usual the humidity hit me but this time it seemed comforting. I felt my fear ebb away. I wandered towards the lamp. It’s light cut cleanly into the black but now at its perfect edge lay only plain emptiness. No dark menace or dread, and overhead just the sound of a breeze rifling through the tips of tall grass.

In that moment I realised that the monster hidden in the morass had been nothing more than the Record itself. That, even in spite of the countless opportunities it had had to reach out and drag me down into its depths, in the end it had decided to withdraw and, at least for now, let me be…”

Tu-Plang 25th Anniversary Digital Deluxe Track Listing

  • I Sucked a Lot of Cock to Get Where I Am
  • Kong Foo Sing
  • G7 Dick Electric Boogie
  • Couldn’t Do It (Happy Shopper Mix)
  • Miffy’s Simplicity
  • Social Disaster
  • Music Is Sport
  • 348 Hz
  • Manana
  • F.S.O.
  • Pop Porn
  • Young Bodies Heal Quickly
  • Blubber Boy (Riding the Wave of Fashion Mix)
  • Doorselfin
  • Son of Sam (b-side to Miffy’s Simplicity single from the album)
  • Don’t Bring Your Devils Home (b-side to Miffy’s Simplicity single from the album)
  • Blood Dub (b-side to Kong Foo Sing single from the album)
  • Ronald’s Lobotomy(b-side to Kong Foo Sing single from the album)
  • I Sucked a Lot of Cock to Get Where I Am (LIVE IN BRISBANE – Festival Hall 1998)
  • Social Disaster (LIVE IN BRISBANE – Festival Hall 1998)
  • Kong Foo Sing (LIVE IN BRISBANE – Festival Hall 1998)
  • Miffy’s Simplicity (LIVE IN BRISBANE – Festival Hall 1998)
  • FSO (LIVE IN BRISBANE – Festival Hall 1998)

Tu-Plang 25th Anniversary Vinyl Track Listing

  • I Sucked a Lot of Cock to Get Where I Am
  • Kong Foo Sing
  • G7 Dick Electric Boogie
  • Couldn’t Do It (Happy Shopper Mix)
  • Miffy’s Simplicity
  • Social Disaster
  • Music Is Sport
  • 348 Hz
  • Manana
  • F.S.O.
  • Pop Porn
  • Young Bodies Heal Quickly
  • Blubber Boy (Riding the Wave of Fashion Mix)
  • Doorselfin
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